University of Oregon

Department of the History of Art and Architecture

Courses

 
Please refer to the drop-down and sidebar menus on this page for History of Art and Architecture courses. Note that many HA&A courses that may be of interest are taught as "experimental courses" and/or as "seminars" and may not appear in official listings.

For the most up-to-date course listings by term, check the UO Schedule of Classes (course descriptions are available by clicking on the course CRN).

Detailed descriptions of current and upcoming courses, as well as a tentative list of the full year of course offerings, also are posted on the wall outside of Lawrence 241. 
 


Grading Criteria for Undergraduate Studies

Criteria considered: 

  • Quality and amount of work
  • Engagement with course expectations and concepts
  • Participation
  • Progress and self-challenge
  • Typical grade distributions
     

A+ through A-: Exceptional or outstanding work that demonstrates keen insight, original thinking, critical analysis, and full command of the material covered in lectures and readings. An "A" grade reflects students’ ability to clearly and thoughtfully articulate what they have learned in the course.

B+ through B-: Good to excellent work that demonstrates strong originality, comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail. In addition, a "B" grade reflects students’ ability to clearly articulate what they have learned in the course.

C+ through C-: Work that exhibits basic comprehension of the material covered in lectures and readings, and some evidence of critical thinking and attention to detail. A "C" grade reflects students’ ability to adequately articulate what they have learned in the course.

D+ through D-: Work that demonstrates minimal comprehension of the material covered in lectures and readings, and little attention to detail. A "D" grade may reflect students’ difficulty in articulating what they have learned in the course.

F: Work that does not demonstrate comprehension of the material covered in lectures and readings. It exhibits consistent problems with comprehension, organization, critical thinking, and supporting details. An "F" grade reflects students’ inability to articulate what they may have learned in the course.
 


Grading Criteria for Graduate Studies

  • Quality and amount of work
  • Engagement with course expectations and concepts
  • Participation
  • Progress and self-challenge
  • Typical grade distributions
     

A+: Truly exceptional work, unusually sophisticated level of engagement with course concepts, insightful participation in class discussions, extraordinary growth. Highest distinction; typically very few if any students receive this grade.

A through A-: Distinctive work, complete success in synthesis of thinking and making, thoughtful and perceptive contributions to discussions, significant personal progress.

B+ through B-: Successful and well-executed work, competency with all course materials, concepts, and objectives, frequent and thoughtful participation, evidence of progress.

C+ through C-: Competent work with most assignments and class work completed, satisfactory grasp of material, participates in discussions most times, made some growth. Typically this grade indicates weak performance in at least one area of expectation.

D+ through D-: Subpar work with significant lack of completion and/or low attendance, course concepts poorly understood, minimal participation, minimal to no growth. Typically this grade indicates significant problems in more than one area of performance.

F: Problematic on all fronts, indicating either no real grasp of the material, significant lack of effort and/or growth, or unacceptably negative forms of engagement with the course materials and the classroom community. Typically very few students receive this grade.

P: Satisfactory performance (B- or above for graduate work).

NOTE: Grade Requirements
Graduate students must maintain at least a 3.00 grade point average (GPA) in graduate courses taken in the degree program. Grades of D+ or lower for graduate courses are not accepted for graduate credit but are computed in the GPA. Similarly, the grade of N (no pass) is not accepted for graduate credit. A grade of pass (P) must be equal to or better than a B-.

A GPA below 3.00 at any time during a graduate student's studies or the accumulation of more than 5 credits of N or F grades--regardless of the GPA--is considered unsatisfactory. The dean of the Graduate School, after consultation with the student's home department, may disqualify the student from the Graduate School, thus terminating the student's degree program.