University of Oregon

Department of the History of Art and Architecture

200 Level Courses

For a list of course offerings specific to a given academic term please consult the University of Oregon Class Schedule.
 

Historical survey of the visual arts. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts studied in relation to the cultures producing them.

The course surveys the history of art and architecture in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East from the origins of art in the Old Stone (Paleolithic) Age, through its expressions in the cultures of Egypt and Mesopotamia, to the art and architecture of Greece and Rome. Emphasis is placed on the ways in which ancient cultures represented the human form, on the social and religious meanings and contexts of ancient art, and the political uses to which ancient art was put.

Format: Lecture/ Discussion Sections

Historical survey of the visual arts. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts studied in relation to the cultures producing them.

This course focuses on the major monuments, artists and artistic developments in Western Europe during the medieval and renaissance periods. Spanning the years from 400 AD to 1550 AD, the course begins with Rome’s fall, and goes on to consider Rome’s legacy, the rise of the Byzantine Empire, and the spread of Christianity and Islam. It continues with the flowering of Carolingian, Ottonian, Romanesque and Gothic cultures in Western Europe. The term finishes with a treatment of the Renaissance, culminating in the works of Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo, Holbein and Dürer.

Covering painting, sculpture, architecture, manuscript illumination and the decorative arts, the course aims to define elements of artistic style and to track the evolution of individual, regional and period styles. Students will, furthermore, examine artworks and artistic movements in the context of political, economic, religious, intellectual and social history, in an attempt to better understand the creation, function and reception of art. Assignments will bring students into direct contact with some of the treasures of the University Art Museum and Knight Library Special Collections.

Format: Lecture/Discussion Sections

Historical survey of the visual arts. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts studied in relation to the cultures producing them.

This class will focus primarily on major artists and developments in western European painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. In addition to the nature and development of individual, regional and period styles, we will consider shifting relationships between the arts and political, religious, social, and economic developments.

Format: Lecture/Discussion Sections

Historical survey of the visual arts of India. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts studied in relation to the culture in which they were produced.

The Indian Art survey course has been designed to develop a critical appreciation of the major art traditions of South Asia from their inception up to the modern period. The course surveys the visual arts of India and presents the various styles developed in the Indian subcontinent together with their historical, religious and socio-cultural contexts. This course has been designed to develop a critical appreciation of the major Buddhist, Hindu and Islamic artistic traditions of India, and will also consider colonial and modern art and architecture. The student is expected to recognize the various trends and learn to explain their development and changes.

Format: Lecture/Discussion Sections

Historical survey of the visual arts of China. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts studied in relation to the culture in which they were produced.

This course is intended as a general (a selective) introduction to the history of Chinese art, and will offer a survey of major artistic developments from neolithic times to the modern period. Among the topics to be considered: ritual bronzes of the Shang and Zhou periods; funerary remains of the Qin and Han; Buddhist sculpture; figure painting and narrative; the evolution of landscape painting form the Han to Qing dynasties; contemporary art. In addition to the analysis of stylistic features, this course will emphasize the philosophical, literary, historical, and cultural contexts within which various artistic traditions developed.

Format: Lecture/Discussion Sections

Historical survey of the visual arts of Japan. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts studied in relation to the culture in which they were produced.

ARH 209 offers a survey of the history of Japanese art from neolithic times to the present, covering a wide range of media and styles. Early pottery traditions, Buddhist art and its ritual context, the aristocratic arts of the Heian court, arms and armors, Zen gardens and architecture, the tea ceremony, the prints and paintings of the Floating World, post-war photography, and the contemporary art of Murakami Takashi and Kaikai Kiki, are among the topics this survey will address. As an archipelago, changes often came to Japan from across the sea, from kingdoms and dynasties in China and on the Korean Peninsula, European nations, and the United States. ARH 209 will focus on some of the ways in which Japan adopted and adapted to foreign cultural traditions. In addition to viewing digital images in class, students will also have the opportunity to see a variety of examples of Japanese art firsthand at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum on the UO campus.

Format: Lecture/ Discussion Sections

Historical survey of modern and contemporary Asian art, architecture, and film. Sequence with ARH 207, 208, 209.

This course introduces a variety of projects spanning the diverse cultures of East, South, and Southeast Asia, while considering outsider representations of the “Asian imaginary.” Students learn to analyze key artworks, exhibitions, cutting edge buildings, urban developments, and experimental and popular films from across Asia. Discussions are linked to hotbed social and theoretical issues, such as modernity vs. tradition, Orientalism, nationalism, local vs. cosmopolitan identities, post-colonialism, urbanization, globalization, and the worlding of Asian cities. Students engage materials through a series of multi-media presentations, film screenings, interdisciplinary readings, guest lectures by artists and curators, museum and gallery visits, and creative projects. Transform your world – take a transcultural adventure right here on campus!
Note: Satisfies Arts and Letters and Multicultural requirements for UO undergraduate students.

Format: Lecture/Discussion Sections